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20130201
20130228
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KPIX (CBS) 11
WJZ (CBS) 6
WUSA (CBS) 5
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English 22
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
controversy because of historical inaccuracies. jan crawford shows us why hollywood finds its "truth" in drama. >> you cannot have both. >> reporter: it's the drama at the heart of the movie. president lincoln struggled to persuade, inspire and outright strong-arm enough members of congress to approve the 13th amendment to ban slavery. >> my son into the war whoa to you if you fail to pass the amendment. >> reporter: but lincoln had more votes than the filmmakers let on. in the movie two connecticut representatives voted nay on the amendment. in fact 148 years ago, the connecticut delegation voted for it. >> we are talking about slavery here. this is not a vote on, you know, approving a highway project. >> reporter: connecticut congressman joe courtney said the inaccuracy denigrated the state. >> somebody who respects artistic license, what i still can't believe is being overlooked is that a vote is not dialogue between characters in a movie. a vote is an event. >> reporter: lincoln's screenwriter tony kushner admitted to change two of connec
supreme court hearings we are joined by jan crawford. so jan, is the argument from the folk was don't like section 5 that racial discrimination no longer exists? >> oh, no and they are not attack the entire voting rights act. if there is discrimination people could still sue but as you pointed out they're challenging section 5. that requires alabama and other mostly southern states to get federal approval before they change their voting laws or requirements even things like where polling places are. they say that provision may have been necessary 48 years ago but today there's no more kraition discrimination in voting in alabama than there is say, in michigan or ohio so why should alabama and those states be treated like it's still 1965. >> jeff: so i know you're going to be there on wednesday. in your estimation, who has the more difficult case. >> well, i think both side grsing to have a tough argument. the justices had a similar challenge a few years ago but they sidestepped this big constitutional issue. but then several just fises seemed skeptical of this provision. chief justice robe
. as jan crawford reports, the challenge to the law comes after decades of change in the south. >> reporter: in shelby county, like in most parts of alabama, the question is whether the state's racist past must forever define it. 50 years ago alabama was the center of the civil rights movement. protesters endured fire hoses, arrests, bombings in the fight for equality. one result was the voting rights act. one provision of the act, section 5, still requires all or part of 16 states, mostly in the south, to get approval from the justice department before changing voting procedures or electoral maps. >> section 5, which is what we're attacking, was never intended by congress to be permanent. >> reporter: shelby county lawyer frank ellis is at the heart of the battle to eliminate section 5 and force the federal government to treat alabama and other coverage states like the rest of the country. >> they're still using the same criteria to determine whether these 16 states that are covered are still using the same test that they used in 1965. >> reporter: what
lining? civil rights battles led to the landmark voting rights act, but now jan crawford tells us the supreme court is about to hear a challenge to the law. and long before ben affleck told the oscar-winning story -- >> you have to know your resume back to front. >> reporterfront. >> pelley: -- david martin broke the story. >> you consider success to be the fact that nobody knew. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. reporting tonight from washington. >> pelley: good evening, detention cells are opening in several states tonight. hundreds of illegal immigrants awaiting deportation are instead being releasedded because the obama administration says it can't afford to hold them. it's a response to automatic across-the-board cuts in federal spending that are due to begin on friday. these cuts were never intended to happen. they were designed by both parties to be so harmful that they would force the president and congress to compromise on a better way. but they haven't. a short while ago, we spoke to the republican speaker of the house, john bo
his ties to a friend and campaign donor. jan crawford is in washington. good morning. >> good morning, norah. good morning, charlie. cbs news has learned the fbi is looking at a whole bunch of allegation including first one on the trip to the republic. the investigation so far has not proven that menendez has had any contact with prostitutes. >> trying to find somebody this many months after the fact based on all the sketchy allegations and unclear claims it's really difficult. it ooh's cold trail. >> that's only part of what's become a steady drip. the fbi and the senate ethics committee are also investigating his relationship with florida doctor salamon melegen. he confirmed they contacted the usa agency. he denied interfering with any investigation. >> i welcome any review but i have no intention of having the smears trying to deviate me from the work that i have been doing and will continue to do. >> reporter: menendez is also accused of trying to help mel jen from. he would have an obvious interest in not seeing the government provide it for flee. >>
competitors fighting for every drop of business. jan crawford reports from the brewery in al alexandria. >> it is mixing with the water. >> as soon as sports city brews one of its four specialty beers, it's out the door. >> we are in a fortunate position. we are selling all the beer we can brew and struggle to keep up with demand. >> bill founded port city brewing company two years ago, tapping into a nationwide boom in craft beers. the growing industry represents 6% of the market. but if sales of large domestic beers decline, sales of craft beers are up 11%. >> it's very similar to what happened in the wine business 15, 20 years ago, people stopped ordering and they started ordering chardonnay. it cost more, but people found it taste better and willing to pay a little more. >> there are 2,000 local breweries across the country as they multiply the opposite is happening with the big beer makers, which are consolidating to global domination. >> how different would budweiser look? what's the difference? >> that's a good question. you could fit this entire brew house into one of th
rights era. john crawford is at the supreme court. jan, this has far-reaching consequences. tell us about what's at issue here? >> reporter: the voting rights act is one of the most arguments now just under way in the supreme court in this really significant challenge, of course president johnson signed the voting rights act back into law in 1965 designed to remove barriers to voting african-americans facing like poll taxes and literacy tests. today's challenge involves just one section of the law, section five, that provision requires 16 states mostly in the south to still go to the justice department to get approval before they want to change any of their voting procedures, even if they just want to move a polling place and people in the south in those states say look things have changed. we may have had to have done that in 1965 but we don't need to be doing that in 2013. blacks are being elected at unprecedented levels. the local offices shouldn't have to keep going to the justice department. the defenders of the law say no doubt things have changed in the
a silver lining? civil rights battles led to the landmark voting rights act, but now jan crawford tells us the supreme court is about to hear a challenge to the law. and long before ben affleck told the oscar-winning story -- >> you have to know your resume back to front. >> pelley: -- david martin broke the story. >> you consider success to be the fact that nobody knew. broke th captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley reporting tonight from washington. >> pelley: good evening, detention cells are opening in several states tonight. hundreds of illegal immigrants awaiting deportation are instead being released because the obama administration says it can't afford to hold them. it's a response to automatic across-the-board cuts in federal spending that are due to begin on friday. these cuts were never intended to happen. they were designed by both parties to be so harmful that they would force the president and congress to compromise on a better way. but they haven't. a short while ago, we spoke to the republican speaker of the house, john boehner. you kn
, has it changed enough? here's chief legal correspondent jan crawford. >> reporter: in shelby county-- like in most parts of alabama-- the question is whether the state's racist past must forever define it. 50 years ago, alabama was the center of the civil rights movement. protesters endured fire hoses, arrests, bombings, and the fight for equality. one result was the voting rights act. one provision of the act section 5, still requires all or part of 16 states-- mostly in the south-- to get approval from the justice department before changing voting procedures or electoral maps. >> section 5, which is what we're attacking, was never intended by congress to be permanent. >> reporter: shelby county lawyer frank ellis is at the heart of the battle to eliminate section 5 and force the federal government to treat alabama and other covered states like the rest of the country. >> they're still using the same criteria to determine whether these 16 states that are covered, they're still using the same test that they used in 1965. >> reporter: what's wrong with that? >> what's wrong with that
, shelby county alabama, challenged the law at the supreme court, and jan crawford was there. >> reporter: the argument sharply divided the justices. the court's conservative majority appeared poised to strike down at least part of the act and eliminate the current federal oversight of voting in the south. at issue-- a decades-old revision in the law that requires nine states, mostly in the south, to get approval from the federal government before changing voting laws or procedures. justice antonin scalia called it a racial entitlement. chief justice john roberts asked if the government believed the citizens in the south are more racist than the citizens in north. roberts said current data on voter turnout revealed more problems in massachusetts than mississippi. congress did not rely on current data when in 2006 it re- authorized the voting rights act. it continued to rely on rates of minority voter registration and turnout in the elections of 1964, 1968, and 1972. alabama attorney frank ellis said congress should look at the modern-day south. >> we ask for some recognition that we-- the
to the landmark voting rights act, but now jan crawford tells us the supreme court is about to hear a challenge to the law. and long before ben affleck told the oscar-winning story -- >> you have to know your resume back to front. >> reporter:front. >> pelley: -- david martin broke the story. >> you consider success to be the fact that nobody knew. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. reporting tonight from washington. >> pelley: good evening, detention cells are opening in several states tonight. hundreds of illegal immigrants
was corresponding with president bill clinton. jan crawford is here with the story. good morning. >> good morning, norah, good morning, j.b. they have released these incredible documents and it shows a surprisingly warm relationship between presidents nixon and clinton. the correspondence includes a handwritten letter congratulating him on a tough primary and election. that letter was the beginning of an unlikely union between the former republican and the democrat. they say politics make strange bedfellows. that was the case in 1992 when he sent a hand-written note to president clinton. the strongest steel must pass through the hottest fire. in enduring that ordeal you have demonstrate thad you have the character to lead. >> it's a very fascinating letter because he's opening up the door to a new incoming president that i'm on your side that i'm impressed by you, that you have the moxie, you have the steel to be president, and i'm here. and that started the beginning of a great friendship between clinton and nixon. >> reporter: presidential historical douglas brinkley s
into the movie. for "cbs this morning," i'm jan crawford from washington. >>> from hollywood ee view of history to washington's view of politics they say people's brains are wired plit lick i and that can can shape political rules. he's head of the brain stimulation lab in south carolina. welcome. >> thank you for having me. >> explain why that is. the way your brain is determine wls you'll be a republican or democrat? >> well it does in part based on interesting and new research as well as a study my students and i conducted at the university of south carolina we can pretty much say unequivocally the brain is wired differently. >> how so? >> we actually scanned the brains of 12 democrats and 12 republicans an then we compared the squans between the two. we stuck them in a scanner and we found serious differences. generally speaking democrats tend to value the connections they have with their friends and the world. i think facebook and the world around you and republicans tend to place more value on the social connections they have. so republicans have this
impact for drinkers and much smaller competitors fighting for every drop of business. jan crawford is at a brewery in alexandria, virginia. this is an interesting story. good morning. royal well, good morning, nora. we're here at port city brewing company. small beer companies like this are really encouraged by the justice department lawsuit because they say the bigger the big beer companies get, the harder it is for the little guy to get a foothold in an increasingly competitive beer market. >> we have the grain. it's mixing with the water -- >> reporter: as soon as port city brews one of its four specialty beers, it's out the door. >> we are in a fortunate position in that we're selling all the beer we can brew, and we struggle to keep up with demand. >> reporter: bill butcher founded port city brewing company four years ago, tapping into a nationwide boom in craft beers. the growing industry represents only 6% of the market. but as sales of large domestic beers decline, sales of craft beers are up 11%. >> it's very similar to what happened in the wine business 15, 20 years ago.
conference yesterday, christie admitted it was not a joke. >> jan crawford . good morning. >> they always mention two things. there's his blunt, no-nonsense talk and then there's his weight. the straight talk, that o's a plus, but the constant talk about his weight could be a potential drag on his campaign. >> i made a few jokes about you, not one or two here and there, but intermittent. >> reporter: david letterman's jokes about chris christie's ee weight may not hurt his feelings but they could hurt his chances for the future. >> i didn't know it was going to be this long. >> when somebody has morbid obesity running around, he's probably got heart disease and continued stress and eventually will have a heart attack, so that's the time bach theory that's bound to happen if he continues that lifestyle. >> reporter: she was white house clinician for president clinton. in 2004 clinton underwent quadruple by pass surgery and he's cently become a vegan, if you can believe that, to try to avert heart disease. no one expects christie to follow clinton's diet. he said tuesday he's not unlike a l
the unofficial campaign is on and it's getting rough on both sides. jan crawford is live. good morning. >> good morning. there's more than a few signs that ashley judd could be running for the seat. it almost sounds like a movie. and even though she said norah, the election is a while away nearly two years away there's already a lot of drama. ashley judd knows politics in hollywood. now she's finding out how it's done in washington. >> ashley judd an obama-following radical liberal. >> earlier this month american cross roads released a web spot that poked fun at president obama. it was the group's answer to speculation judd may run againstky senator mitch mcconnell who's vying for a sixth term. judd hasn't officially announced her candidacy but a recent move suggests she's seriously considering it. >> she had a meeting last week with donors in louisville and she plans to talk with governor steven brashear. she's checking all the box when someone is seriously considering running. >> supporters believe she could raise cash and energize voters but there is one pr
season. >>> and very little in washington is safe from the potential cuts including animals. jan crawford is on the national mall. good morning. >> reporter: well, good morning. you know, we hear a lot about some of the serious implications these cuts could have -- widespread layoffs cuts in the military, changes in air travel. there are places that could be affected that we don't even think about. the parks, monuments even like you said nora animals at the national zoo. damai is a rare sumatran tiger and one of the most closely watched animals at the smithsonian national zoo where everyone has one question -- is she or isn't me? >> we are hopeful, fingers crossed, that she's pregnant. >> reporter: the only way to tell for sure is through an ultrasound. so what does that have to do with the sequester? it turns out that getting damai ready for her all-important trawl sound takes intense -- ultrasound takes intensive training. that is in jeopardy. >> training research things like this would be the first on my list. >> reporter: research is what the zoo is k
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)